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SUMMIT COUNTY, OHIO
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Summit: Created in 1840 from Medina, Portage and Stark Counties. County Seat: Akron Courthouse: 175 S. Main St., Akron, OH 44308-1306 (216) 379-2512.

YOGSOH SUMMIT-01:  GREAT NORTHERN SAVINGS 1984 SOUVENIR PRINTS PACKET.  The cover envelope shows 13 scenes from Summit County.  Enclosed in this are EIGHT quite-framable reproductions of the area.  The eight included in this packet are printed in black ink on white paper.  They have a frame, the picture which resembles an engraving or woodcut and a panel across the bottom with an explanation of what is on view in each picture.  They are each 8 " by 11" in size and could be matted in a 9" by 12" frame.  The eight scenes are well done and clean. 
1.) is of Bronson Memorial Church overlooking Peninsula Village.  Bronson Memorial Church sits quietly beside Ohio Rt. 303 in the historic village of Peninsula.  The "carpenter gothic" structure, built in 1839, has a wood paneled interior, candle chandelier, pot-bellied stove and old reed organ.  Owned and operated by the Summit County Historical Society, it is used for weddings and other religious services.  2.) Everett Covered Bridge of Bygone Days.  Spanning Furnace Run near its confluence with the Cuyahoga River was the last covered bridge in Summit County.  Built in 1857, it was a favorite place for artists and photographers until washed out by a storm in 1975.  Plans are being made to restore it.  3.) Maple Syrup Time at Hale Farm.  Warm days and cold nights bring on the flow of maple sap.  At Hale's Farm's sugar bush the sap is gathered and evaporated much as it was done in the early days by Hale family members.  It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup.  4.)  Frazee-Hynton House in Valley View.  Built in the 1820s, the handsome red brick Frazee-Hynton house on a hill overlooking the canal was one of the earliest structures in the Cuyahoga Valley.  In its day it witnessed both stagecoach and canal traffic.  The house has been restored as a local landmark.    
6.)  Cuyahoga Valley Line Train Passes National Park Offices. Explore the valley on Saturdays from June to October on the historic steam train that runs from Cleveland to Akron.  Here it's passing the old mill tyown of Jaite, former company store and worker's houses have been restored and are now headquarters of the Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area.
6.)  Harvest Festival Time at Hale Homestead.  October in the Cuyahoga Valley is truly a spectacle of colors.  It is the time for shocking corn and harvesting fat pumpkins.  Hale Farm and Village celebrates the season with a harvest festival in which the smell of hearth-baked Johnny cake and beef stew adds to the authentic nineteenth century atmosphere and one can observe many of the askills and recreational activities of pioneer settlers.  7.)  Restored Locktender's House at Twelve-Mile lock.  On Canal Road near the north end of the park the locktender's house is bing restored.  Here' tradition has it, lived the locktender who operated and maintained the adjacent Twelve-Mile Lock.  Eventually this building will house the National Parki Services Nuseum of the Ohio and Erie Canal, remains of which comprise one of the park's most important historic resources.  8.)  Deep Lock on the Ohio and Erie Canal.  This lock, the deepest of 42 on the Old Canal between Cleveland and Akron, raised canal boats 17 feet.  Both the lock and nearby abandoned sandstone quarries are included in the Akron Metropolitan Park System.  Complete set of eight prints.  [Would make a lovely set as a gift for a teenager with ancestors from Summit County to color with a set of colored pencils to remind them of their Heritage and a few visits to the area to see these attractions would be good too! PRICE:  $20  

YOGSOH SUMMIT-02:  SUMMIT COUNTY, OHIO CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS, VOLUME I, 1813-1978.  Published by the Summit County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society.  Covers Bath Township, Copley Township, and Norton Township.  104 pages, punched for a three ring binder but stapled together with cardstock covers.  There is no way to tell how many burials for each surname appear on any one page of any one volume.  We do think it is appropriate to note on how many pages that surname is listed, as within any one township the likelihood of all the people in that township with that one surname  to be related in some way is reasonable or, at least, practical.  Surnames which appear on 5 pages (,) or more than 5 (#) pages  are listed here:  Adair 7, Arnold 17, Averill 7, Baird, Baker, Barber, Barker 6, Bauer 9, Bell 5, Bender 10, Biashop 6, Boerstler, Boltz, Boughton 8, Brown 6, Capron 6, Carpenter 7, Caskey 7, Chapman 9, Clark, Crosier 7, Davis 14, Dobbins, Dockus, Elzholz, Emery, Evans 8, Francisco, Frank 6, Frederick 11, Fryman 6, Griswold 9, Hayman 8, Harris 13, Hartzell, Hawkings 6, Heller 7, Hershey, Himelright, Hull, Hurlburt, Hutchison 6, Johnson 6, Jones, Knecht 8, Lahr 8, Leiby, Long 7, McFarlin, McNeil, Martin 9, Mentzer, Miksch 7, Miller 38, Moore 7, Mull, Myers 10, Nash 6, Osborn 6, Parker 7, Perry, Point, Porter 8, Reimer, Richards 6, Rishel, Ritchie 7, Robinson 13, Rothrock 7, Serfass 6, Shaw, Smith 21, Snyder 14, Sprankle, Squires, Stauffer, Stuver, Swigart, Taylor 9, Theiss, Thompson 10, Weeks 7, Williams, Wilson, Wise,  and Young 7.  Sold as a set with Volume 2 below  2 volumes for $45

YOGSOH SUMMIT-03:  SUMMIT COUNTY, OHIO CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS, VOLUME II, 1813-1978.  Published by the Summit County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society.  Bath Township, Copley Township, and Norton Township.  111 pages, punched for a three ring binder but stapled together with cardstock covers.  There is no way to tell how many burials for each surname appear on any one page of any one volume.  We do think it is appropriate to note on how many pages that surname is listed, as within any one township the likelihood of all people in that township with the same surname would be to be related in some way.  It is reasonable or, at least, practical.  Surnames which appear on 5 pages (,) or more than 5 (#) pages are listed here:  Adams 9, Anderson 10, Bailey, Baker, Baughman 12, Beard, Becker 9, Beltz 10, Bender 7, Benner 6, Bettler 6, Bliler 8, Bower/s 14, Braucher 7, Brexckenridge, Breitenstine 8, Brown 8, Burgner 8, Butler, Carmany 11, Carr, Cole, Conrad 6, Cook 6, Cox 9, Dailey 20, Davis 15, Denious 9, Dickerhoff 19, Dissinger 7, Evans 8, Fosnight, Foster 10, Foust 9, Frase 11, Garmen 8, Greenho/e 9, Griffith, Grubb 6, Harbaugh 8, Haring 12, Harter 10, Hartong 10, Henderson, Henry 8, Hollinger 7, Hoover 7, Huber, Ingram 7, Johnson 8, Jones 10, Keller 8, Kepler 21, Kerstetter 6, Killinger 7, King 6, Koons 8, Koontz 6, Kramer, Kreighbaum, Kyser, Lauby, Lewis 15, Ludwick, Marsh 10, Martin 6, Messner 8, Miller 32, Moore 6, Morgan, Morris 7, Myers 22, Oberlin 13, Palmer, Price 6, Ream, Rex 6, Rhoades 8, Rhodes 10, Richards, Ries 6, Rininger 89, Ritter 7, Row 6, Scott, Serfass 9, Shook 6, Sisler 11, Smith 41, Snyder 24, Sorrick 11, Sours 13, Sowers, Spangler 11, Spidel 7, Stake, Stewart 6, Streby 7, Stump 13, Sweitzer, Swigart 15, Thompson, Thornton 8, Thursby 9, Traxler 11, Tritt 9, Turner 6, Vandersall 6, Wagner, Wagoner, Warley 6, Warner 15, Weaver 8, Wholf, Williams 22, Winkleman 6, Wise 9, Wolf/e 8, Woods 6, Workinger 6 and Yer(r)ick 7.


See Howe's Histories for more on this county.

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