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Newsletter Subtitle: Census Indexes & Transcriptions from Illinois
Month Day Year:  September 28, 2010


WELCOME TO CRAZY CRATE JP58!
 
Hello Everyone,      
 
Here we are with another great crate.  This crate is brimming full of Illinois State and Federal Census Indexes and some Transcriptions!  Just imagine looking at something in ten or twelve point type that will help you find great-grandpa and his wife!  It may tell you his page number and line number.  It may list all his children still living at home and their ages, and depending on the census, it might tell you in what state they were born or which state their mother and father were born. Because their area of coverage being so small - sometimes only one county - you can see every surname that could be yours and study similar spellings and check them out without having to use a keyboard, just flip a page!  No electricity needed except a light bulb.  Give your computer/microfilm weary eyes a rest!
 
[NOTE FROM PAT!]  You've all seen the old saying, "Old Genealogists Never Die, They Just Lose Their Census."  I have a great mini-poster with that saying on it plus a cartoon drawing of a very excited and happy man, surrounded by piles of paper, [aren't we all?] holding a stream of paper census sheets labeled 1860. The wide-eyed look on his smiling face tells you he has just located his long lost ancestors.  [Remember that thrill of finding some ancestor his wife and ten children on that screen?]   This poster, just 8 ½" by 11" on sturdy weight paper, fits nicely into a matted 9" by 12" frame, and is available now.  You may want to frame and post it in your genealogy room, over your microfilm reader or near your computer.  This poster also makes a nice "Thank You" gift for someone who has helped you locate a good source for forms and charts, find a special book, shared some documentation you need and she already had, found something for you in a book in a library you have not had time to go to yet or just a cousin who finally filled out and returned that family group sheet you sent him four years ago!  Usually priced at $2, it is available with the purchase of any of these census books for only $1 extra.
 
Wish it was possible to scan it on, but my computer crashed over a week ago Thursday [that is why there was no newsletter on Tuesday or Friday of this week. Worst of all it took my printers with it and now they won't work either. The computer is up and running, but is obviously still "sick" as it simply will not do some of the things it is supposed to do, and my scanner went out when my printer stopped working.  [Don't you just love our new electronic world, in which any electronic phone or other machine or gadget feels perfectly free to throw a "hissy fit" and quit working whenever you have something that has to be done right now!]  Since venting rage is a perfectly acceptable way of handling it, I need to tell you I feel much better now!
 
Back to John Palmer's crate. 
 
We certainly don't want any of that to happen to you, so we're offering a whole crate full of census transcriptions and census indexes in print, not on microfilm or microfiche.  These books were done by experienced genealogists many of whom lived in the county they were transcribing or who have thoroughly exhausted their eyes studying microfilm late at night, so we don't have to do it to ours. 
 
We've all had problems using the Heritage Quest and Ancestry census indexes.  Sometimes the name you are looking for just doesn't show up, even though you know it should be there.  Other times the index brings up 9,242 responses.  [You could be an octogenarian, if you are not one already] before you sorted all of them out to find, for sure, which one was yours. 

Because of the limited census area in these books, [rather than all creation over a few hundred years], you will find it much easier to scan for possible misspellings of the surnames involved. 
 
Most census takers were able to spell what they heard, but some were more creative than others.  Maybe some were hard of hearing, or speaking to someone of a different ethnic background? 
We are the ones that need to learn to not pay too much attention to the "s" on the end of the surname because families were often referred to as the Browns when the family name is just Brown, or the Smiths when that only meant there weremore than one of that surname living thereMayers or Meyers when they were actually Mayer or Meyer families.
 And then there is the matter of
the "e" at the end which may have
been added to a simple name just to mark separate branches of the same name. Ash / Ashe, Brown /Browne, or Cook/ Cooke, or Cock/ Cocke.r, [Note: In some cases, th e misspelling added the "es" as in Bell became Belles and Hay became Hayes.] 

Think about how the census taker might have heard the name and then look for possible other spellings. Look for silent letters as in Knight/ Night, or Wright/ Right.  Watch for  letters which produce the same sounds as in Kohls/ Coles/ Coales, or Cramer/ Kraemer.
Possibly there are letters which may be substituted at the end of a name, also, that have similar sounds as in d/t in Shourd/ Short, Arndt/Arnt. 
There are words which can be spelled in different ways phonetically such as Read, Reed, Reid or Nicholson, Nickolson, Nickleson, Nickelson. 
Look for elements of a word that sound alike but may cause them to be found alphabetically separated, such as Pearse/Peirce, Arnest/ Earnest, Bryan/ Brian, Byrd/Bird, Filson/ Philson, Pharris/Ferris, Aylett/ Alett. 
You will find letters that may be doubled or added in one name and not in the other Philips/ Phillips, Abel/ Abell, Barnz/ Barns/ Barnes, Beal/ Bealle, Brown/ Browne, Clark/ Clarke. 
Letters omitted, not correctly heard or misunderstood can have the same effect, such as Cowles written as Coles, Archer written as Arker, Atkins written as Akins, Bridgeford written as Bridford, Hawthorne written as Hathorn, Highland written as Hiland, Hughs written as Huse, Engels written as Ingles, Lewis written as Louis. Orl written as Orrel, Orrl and Orl, Prentice written as Prentis, Ratcliff written as Ratliff/ Ratlkiff/ Ratlieff, Rhoades may be written as Roads & Rhodes, Reynolds may be written as Renolds, Row written as Roe, Row, Rowe, Royle.
Also common is Sanders written for Saunders and Tyler may be written as Tiler or Tilor. Wallace may be written as Wallis, Whyte may be written as White. 
You will also need to remember that "a Greek e" may often look like a double (oo), causing a Toole to be read as a Tooloo.  Or a Sealiman may appear as a "Soolyman.
Most of us quickly learn when we get to early Virginia that the "funny looking "f?" is actually a double (ss)!
 The important part is you must decide, by doing further research on both people, whether there is a relationship or not.  Not all misspellings turn out to be lost relatives, but some do.  You don't want to risk not checking them out and the smaller area in which you are looking the better is your chance of finding out quickly. 

 
ILLINOIS  CENSUS
 
Hopefully, these books will help you out.  This week we are featuring Illinois Census and Census Indexes.  This is not a complete list of what we have.  More will be coming later.
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 1:  Index to the State Census of De Kalb County, Illinois.  1855.  Compiled by Mrs. Harlin B. Taylor.  Decatur, IL:  VIO-LIN Enterprises, 1972.  25 pages.  Softcover.  The 1855 state census marks a half-way point between the two federal census reports, 1850 and 1860, providing researchers with a chance to narrow down the time frame in which their ancestors either moved away from the county or into the county.  Information in the state census included the names of the heads of families, number of free white males and females, in the following age groups:  Under 10;  10 - 20;  20 - 30;  30 - 40;, 40 - 50; 50 - 60; 60 - 70; 70 - 80; 80 - 90; and over 90.  In addition, it provided the number of persons serving in the militia, Negroes and Mulattoes - male and female;  manufactories of all kinds;  value of products of manufactories;  value of products of coal mines;  number of pounds of wool;  value of livestock; number of colleges, number of pupils; number of common schools, number of pupils and remarks.   
This book is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the person, then the first name.  Information also given is the township page and line number of the census where the entire entry may be found.  According to a notation in the census, the total number of inhabitants on the first day of July was 1,366.  Only one Negro and one Mulatto are listed.    The census taker was Mr. Jesse Rhodes.  Mr. Rhodes was very inconsistent in his writing.  His "e", "r" "j", and "i" were sometimes very indistinguishable as well as the double "s".  Letters within the same word would sometimes be written differently.  Any questionable word or letter has been underlined in this index.  Price:  $7
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 2:  Index to the 1830 Federal Census of Illinois:  Volume 1: Alexander, Pope, Union, Johnson, Jackson, Franklin, Perry, Randolph, Monroe, Washington, Marion, Jefferson, Hamilton and Gallatin Counties. This book was compiled by James V. Gill and Maryan R. Gill.  Indianapolis:  Heritage House.  1970.  57 pages.  Softcover.  This index was made from Microcopy 19, Roll 22 of the United States Federal Census.  This book is the first of four volumes in this set.  This book contains nearly 3,000 names and is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the person, then the first name.  Information includes the county, page and line where the original information may be found.  While preparing this index, the compilers discovered that handwriting and spelling of the census takers ranged from good to miserable and on the average seemed to be worse on this reel than on previous reels they had indexed.  As a result, there are many names in this index that are obviously wrong.  Nmes wer copied by the indexer as they were found on the film. Enumerators used several styles in coping with the "Mc" names.  In some cases, the letters following the "Mc" were not capitalized, but were spaced.  There were several forms of "Junior" and "Senior".  Some peculiarities of this census included:  Alexander County was mostly in alphabetical order.    It is difficult to tell the Jr. from Sr. and Capital "L" from capital "S" in the Pope County enumeration.    Similar problems with capital "S" and "L" plus small "r" and "s" were found in the Union County list.  In Randolph County, the small "a" and "u" were similar.   There were no dots for the "i" in the Jefferson County list.   Knowledge like this helps you to consider irregularities in the spelling.  Price: $10
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 3:  Index to the 1830 Federal Census of Illinois: Volume 4: White, Edwards, Wabash, Wayne, Clay, Clinton, St. Clair, Madison, Bond, Fayette, and Lawrence Counties.  This book was compiled by James V. Gill.  Indianapolis:  Heritage House.  1968.  Unpaged (about 57 pages).  softcover.  This index was made from Microcopy 19, Roll 25 of the United States Federal Census.    This book contains nearly 3,000 names and is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the head of the household, then the first name.  Information includes the county, page and line where the original information may be found.  Remember, wives and children were not listed in the census until 1850.  While preparing this index, the compilers discovered that handwriting and spelling of the census takers ranged from good to miserable. As a result, there are many names in this index that are obviously wrong.  Enumerators used several styles in coping with the "Mc" names.   In some cases, the letters following the "Mc" were not capitalized, but were spaced.  Complicating the work of the enumerators in several counties, particularly St. Clair, was the numerous French names.  If you seek French names in this index, look for all possible and impossible spellings.   In all cases the words were typed as they were written after deciphering by the writer of the book. Price: $10
 
Volumes 2 &3 are at the printer's. Watch for them soon on these crates.
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 4:  Illinois 1840 Census Index.  Volume 1 Adams - Du Page Counties.  Compiled by Maxine E. Wormer.  Indianapolis: Heritage House.   1973.  89 pages.  Softcover.  This first volume of the index to the 1840 federal census for the State of Illinois was taken from National Archives microfilm rolls M704-54 through M704-57 and part of M704-58.  Every effort was made to copy the names as accurately as possible but the spelling and penmanship of the various county enumerators ranged from very good to very bad.  Several forms of "Senior" and "Junior" were used and it is sometimes difficult to differentiate between them.    This index contains the names of over 5,000 heads of households for the 1840 census.  The format of this index includes the head of the household followed by the county of residence and the page number where the name was found.  Alphabetically, the counties of Cumberland and Douglas would fall within the above group of counties.  However, they were not formed until 1843 and 1859, respectively.  Anyone searching for persons who may have lived in the areas comprising the present-day counties of Cumberland and Douglas should check the parent county of these two which was Coles County.   Price:  $13
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 5:  Illinois 1840 Census Index.  Volume 2:  Edwards - Jefferson Counties.  This book was also compiled by Maxine E. Wormer.  Indianapolis: Heritage House.  1974.  86 pages.  Softcover.  This second volume of the index to the 1840 federal census for the State of Illinois was taken from National Archives microfilm rolls M704-58 through M704-61.  Every effort was made to copy the names as accurately as possible but the spelling and penmanship of the various county enumerators ranged from very good to very bad.  Several forms of "Senior" and "Junior" were used and it is sometimes difficult to differentiate between them. This index contains the names of nearly 5,000 heads of households for the 1840 census. The format of this index includes the head of the household followed by the county of residence and the page number where the name was found.  There were peculiarities noted in several counties:  Edgar County: Due to ink splotches on page 116 of the original microfilm it was impossible to read the initials or given names of several individuals.  Edwards County:  Among the names listed on page 121 - 125 there are 58 names that had been duplicated originally somewhere within those pages.  For example, Asa Pixley appears on page 121 and 124.  Both listings are obviously for the same person as the household statistics were identical.  Occasionally there are variations in the spellings of the duplicate names.  Fulton County:  Numbers on pages 230 - 286 were originally imprinted incorrectly, putting them out of sequence with preceding page numerals. page 230 was imprinted 330, 231 imprinted as 331, etc. )  correct page numbers, in order to be in sequence, had been written in by hand and these are the page numbers used in the index. Gallatin County: the bottom parts of pages 2 and 5 were torn off and thus not reproduced on the microfilm.  Greene and Hamilton counties:  the left hand sides were not reproduced clearly. Hancock County:  Pages 166 and 167 at the top of which were written "Hardin County" were mixed in with Hancock county on the microfilm.  Jefferson County:
In some instances the "t" was not crossed, making it difficult to distinguish between a "t' and an "i".  Also, from the compiler's own knowledge some of the surnames were spelled incorrectly. However, this index shows them as written by the enumerator.    Price: $13

 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 6:  Illinois 1840 Census Index. Volume 3:  Jersey - Marshall Counties.   Compiled by Maxine E. Wormer.  Indianapolis: Heritage House.  1975.  85 pages.  Softcover.  This third volume of the index to the 1840 federal census for the State of Illinois was taken from National Archives microfilm rolls M704-61 through M704-65.  Every effort was made to copy the names as accurately as possible but the spelling and penmanship of the various county enumerators ranged from very good to very bad.  Several forms of "Senior" and "Junior" were used and it is sometimes
difficult to differentiate between them.  This index contains the names of nearly 5,000 heads of households for the 1840 census.  The format of this index includes the head of the household followed by the county of residence and the page number where the name was found. There were peculiarities noted in several counties:  Jo Daviess county:  Much of the handwriting has faded so badly that it was not reproduced clearly on the microfilm.  Some names were impossible to read.  Knox County: The left hand side of schedule sheet 43 appears to have been patched with tape, making some of the given names illegible on the microfilm.  Lawrence county:  In addition to the common first name abbreviations, this enumerator used a great many unusual ones.  Some are easily interpreted bit it is a moot question what some of the others mean.  Logan County:  The handwriting on schedule sheets 235 - 238 has faded, making it difficult to read.   Macon County:  part of the lower left hand side of schedule sheets 2 - 4 appears to have been torn off, making it impossible to read the complete names of several individuals.  Macoupin County:  the names of fourteen common schools and one seminary were listed by this enumerator. Rather than scatter them alphabetically through this index, they have been alphabetized under the heading :"schools": on page 677.    Madison County:  This enumerator was not consistent in forming the letter "S", in some instances, instead of the common resemblance to letter "L", it looked more like a badly formed "J". Marion County:  From this compiler's own knowledge, several surnames were misspelled, however they were copied as written by the enumerator.  Price:  $12

 
The other volume is at the printers.  We will let you know when it is available.
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 7:  Illinois 1850 Mortality Schedule.  Volume 1:  Adams Through Iroquois Counties.    Transcribed and indexed by Lowell M. Volkel.  Indianapolis:  Heritage House.  1972, 2nd printing 1977.  105 pages.  softcover.  The year 1850 marked the beginning of a new epoch in Federal Census enumeration.  Prior to that year only heads of families were listed with the number of residents in each household divided into various age categories.  The distinction of the 1850 census was the extensive new enumeration of six different schedules, including the Mortality Schedule.   In lieu of a standard system of death registration throughout the United States, the federal government adopted the use of the Mortality Schedule to aid in the compilation of certain cause of death and health statistics.  This schedule listed only those people who died within the year prior to the beginning of the census enumeration.  For 1850, only those deaths occurring between June 12, 1849 and May 31, 1850 would be listed.    There are 11 columns in the 1850 Mortality Schedule:
1)  Name of Every person who died during the year ending 1st June, 1850, whose usual place or abode at the time of his death was in his family;  2)  age; 3)  Sex;  4)  color (White, Black or Mulatto);  5 free or slave;  6)  married or widowed; 7)  Place of Birth (Naming the State, Territory or Country);  8)  The month in which the person died;  9)  the deceased's profession, occupation or trade;  10)  Disease or Cause of Death  and 11)  Number of Days Ill.  This transcription appears, as nearly as possible, just as the original was written.  One exception is that the sworn statements affirming the truth of the schedules have been condensed to include only names and dates.  Arrangement of the book is alphabetical by county.  Within each county, the names are arranged as they are found on the original records.  The 24- page index contains nearly 4,000 names and shows where the full information can be found in the book.   Price: $14
 
Volume II will be available soon.  Watch future crates for more information.
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 8:  Illinois 1850 Mortality Schedule.  Volume 3:  Peoria Through Woodford Counties.    Transcribed and Indexed  by Lowell M. Volkel.  Indianapolis:  Heritage House.   No date.  91 pages.  softcover.  The year 1850 marked the beginning of a new epoch in Federal Census enumeration.  Prior to that year only heads of families were listed with the number of residents in each household divided into various age categories.  The distinction of the 1850 census was the enumeration of six different schedules, including the Mortality Schedule.   In lieu of a standard system of death registration throughout the United States, the federal government adopted the use of the Mortality Schedule to aid in the compilation of certain cause of death and health statistics.  This schedule listed only those people who died within the year prior to the beginning of the census enumeration.  For 1850, only those deaths occurring between June 12, 1849 and May 31, 1850 would be listed.    There are 11 columns in the 1850 Mortality Schedule:   1)  Name of Every person who died during the year ending 1st June, 1850, whose usual place or abode at the time of his death was in his family;  2)  age; 3)  Sex;  4)  color (White, Black or Mulatto);  5 free or slave;  6)  married or Widowed; 7)  Place of Birth (Naming the State, Territory or Country);  8)  The month in which the person died;  9)  the deceased's profession, occupation or trade;  10)  Disease or Cause of Death  and 11)  Number of Days Ill.  This transcription appears, as nearly as possible, just as the original was written.  One exception is that the sworn statements affirming the truth of the schedules have been condensed to include only names and dates.  The 21- page index covers over 2,000 names.
Price:  $13
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 9: 1850 Census of Edwards County, Illinois.  Compiled by Marjorie Smith.  Thomson, IL:  Heritage House.  1972.  45 pages.  Softcover.  Edwards County, on the southwestern border of Illinois, was formed from Gallatin County in 1814, four years prior to the erection of the State of Illinois.  The earliest county court was held in January 1815 at a place called Palmyra, now extinct.  Albion, the present county seat, was laid out in 1819 and was settled principally by English immigrants.  The first court was held there December 3, 1821.  Wabash County was setoff from Edwards in 1824, the dividing line being the Bonpas Creek.  Information in this book is arranged numerically by the house and family number as it is shown in the original census record.  Surname is listed, then first names of everyone in the family, ages, sex, and place of birth, occupations and real estate values.  Price: $8
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 10:  Monroe County, Illinois 1850 Census.  Transcribed by Maxine E. Wormer.  Indianapolis:  Heritage House/Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe.  1976.  93 pages.  Softcover.  This transcription of the 1850 census for Monroe County was taken from Microfilm No. M-432, Roll No. 121.  The Census was taken between August and 19 November, 1850.  Every effort was made to transcribe the names as accurately as possible but occasionally poor penmanship made the reading of names difficult.  There was the common difficulty in distinguishing between "L" and "S".  Also, in some instances, it was questionable whether the letter was "H", "R", or "K".  A question mark after a name, age or birthplace indicates transcriber could not be certain it had been deciphered correctly.    Information concerning value of real estate owned, whether persons attended school within the year and whether persons over 20 years of age could read and write, was not copied from the schedule sheets.    This transcription contains   1)  name of every person whose usual place of abode on the 1st day of June 1850 was with his family  2) Age;  3)  Sex,; 4) Place of birth;  5) Profession, occupation or trade of each male person over 15 years of age; 6) race, if other than white; 7) whether deaf, dumb, blind, pauper, etc.  Information in this book is arranged numerically by the house and family number as it is shown in the original census record.  The ten-page index covers nearly 1,500 surnames and shows on what pages of this book the name appears.   Price:  $13
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 11:  Warren County Illinois 1850 Census.  Transcribed by Maxine E. Wormer.    Indianapolis, IN:  Heritage House/Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe:  1976.   91 pages.  Softcover.  Note:  We recently received this book from the publisher.  It appears to be either an original copy or a very early reprint.  This transcrip
tion of the Seventh United States Census (1850) for Warren County, Illinois was taken from Microfilm No. M-432, Roll No. 131. Every effort was made to transcribe the census as accurately as possible
but poor penmanship made the reading of some names difficult.  Names that were obviously misspelled were transcribed just as they were written. If there was a questionable spelling of a name, both spellings were listed in the index.    Information concerning value of real estate owned, whether persons attended school within the year and whether persons over 20 years of age could read and write, was not copied from the schedule sheets.  Information is provided for each of the following five columns:  1) Name of every person whose usual place of abode on the 1st day of June 1850 was with this family;  2)  Age.; 3)  Sex:  4) Place of  birth; and  5) profession, occupation or trade of each male person over 15 years of age
; race if other than white; whether deaf, dumb, blind, pauper, etc. and miscellaneous information.  The seven-page index covers nearly
1,000 surnames.    Price: $13

 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 12:  Whiteside County,  Illinois 1850 Census.  Transcribed by Dora Wilson Smith.   Indianapolis, IN:  Heritage House/Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe:  1977.   64 pages.  Softcover.  Note:  We recently received this book from the publisher.  It appears to be either an original copy or a very early reprint.  This transcription of the Seventh United States Census (1850) for Whiteside County, Illinois was taken from Microfilm at the National Archives.  Information is provided for each of the following six columns:  1)  Name of every person whose usual place of abode on the 1st day of June 1850 was with this family;  2)  Age.;  3)  Sex:  4)  Place of  birth;  5) profession, occupation or trade of each male person over 15 years of age; race if other than white; whether deaf, dumb, blind, pauper, etc.  and miscellaneous information;  and  6) Value of real estate owned by the individual.  The amount owned by the head of household is given after the family number.  The six-page index covers nearly 900 surnames.    Price: $10
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 13:  Index to the State Census of De Kalb County, Illinois.  1855.  Compiled by Mrs. Harlin B. Taylor.  Decatur, IL:  VIO-LIN Enterprises, 1972.  25 pages.  Softcover.  The 1855 state census marks a half-way point between the two federal census reports, providing researchers with a chance to narrow down the time frame in which their ancestors either moved away from the county or into the county.  Information in the state census included the names of the heads of families, number of free white males and females, in the following age groups:  Under 10;  10 - 20;  20 - 30;  30 - 40;, 40 - 50; 50 - 60; 60 - 70; 70 - 80; 80 - 90; and over 90.  In addition, it provided the number of persons serving in the militia, Negroes and Mulattoes - male and female;  manufactories of all kinds;  value of products of manufactories;  value of products of coal mines;  number of pounds of wool;  value of livestock; number of colleges, number of pupils; number of common schools, number of pupils and remarks.   This book is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the person, then the first name.  Information given is the township page and line number of the census where the entire entry may be found.  According to a notation in the census, the total number of inhabitants on the first day of July was 1,366.  Only one Negro and one Mulatto are listed.    The census taker was Mr. Jesse Rhodes.  Mr. Rhodes was very inconsistent in his writing.  His "e", "r" "j", and "i" were very indistinguishable as well as the double "s".  Letters within the same word would sometimes be written differently.  Any questionable
word or letter has been underlined in this index.  Price: $7

 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 14:  Illinois Mortality Schedule, 1860, Volume 2:  All Counties in Alphabetical Order, Fayette through Knox.  Transcribed and Indexed by Lowell M. Volkel.  Indianapolis:  Heritage House/Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe.  No date (possibly 1980).   Pages 99 through 198. Softcover.  This is the second volume of a complete transcription of the 1860 Mortality Schedule for the State of Illinois. and continues the pagination from volume 1.  This schedule listed only those people who died within the one year prior to the beginning of the census enumeration.  As June 1 was the beginning date for the census, only those deaths from June 1, 1859 through May 31, 1860 are recorded.  The eleven columns of the 1860 Mortality schedule contain the same information as the 1850 schedule did.  The columns are headed as follows:  1)  Name of every person who died during the year ending 1st June 1860, whose usual place of abode at the time of his death was in his family; 2)  age;  3) Sex;  4)  Color (white, black or mulatto);  5) free or slave;  6)  Married or Widowed;  7)  Place of birth, naming the state, territory, or country;  8)  The month in which the person died;  9)  profession, occupation, or trade;  10)  disease or cause of death;  11)  number of days ill.  There are a few lines reserved for "remarks: at the bottom of each page.  Whatever remarks were recorded there appear in this transcription. The 24- page alphabetical index covers nearly 4,000 names and lists the page where the complete information may be found.   Price: $14
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 15:  Illinois Mortality Schedule, 1860, Volume V:  All Counties in Alphabetical Order,   Wabash through Woodford.  Transcribed and Indexed by Lowell M. Volkel.  Indianapolis:  Heritage House/Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe.  No date (possibly 1981). pages 355 through 403   Softcover.  This is the fifth and final volume of a complete transcription of the 1860 Mortality Schedule for the State of Illinois and continues the pagination found in the previous volumes. This schedule listed only those people who died within the one year prior to the beginning of the census enumeration.  As June 1 was the beginning date for the census, only those deaths from June 1, 1859 through May 31, 1860 are recorded.  The   eleven columns of the 1860 Mortality schedule contain the same information as the 1850 schedule did.  The columns are headed as follows:  1)  Name of every person who died during the year ending 1st June 1860, whose usual place of abode at the time of his death was in his family;  2)  age;  3) Sex;  4)  Color (white, black or mulatto);  5) free or slave;  6)  Married or Widowed;  7)  Place of birth, naming the state, territory, or country;  8)  The month in which the person died;  9)  profession, occupation, or trade;  10)  disease or cause of death;  11)  number of days ill.   There are a few lines reserved for "remarks: at the bottom of each page.  Whatever remarks were recorded there appear in this transcription.    The ten-page alphabetical index covers nearly 1,800 names and lists the page where the complete information may be found.  This volume also includes the full 31 page alphabetical name index covering over 10,000 names in the five volume set.  Price:  $9
 
CRAZY CRATE JP 58 BOOK 16:  1870 Illinois Mortality Schedules, Volume IV.  Counties:  Ogle, Peoria, Perry, Piatt, Pike, Pope, Pulaski, Putnam, Randolph, Richland, Rock Island and Saline. Transcribed and Index by Lowell M. Volkel.  No publisher.  No date (possibly 1987). Sixty pages, pages 128 - 188.  softcover.    This volume is a continuation of a series of transcriptions of the 1870 Illinois Mortality schedules.  The Mortality Schedule listed only those people who died within the year prior to the beginning of the census enumeration.  In this case, the dates included are those occurring between June 1, 1869 and May 31, 1870.   There were 12 columns of information found in this schedule. 1)  Number of the Family as given in the 2nd column of Schedule 1;  2)  Name of every person who died during the year ending June 1, 1870;  3)  Age at last birthday;  4)  Sex;  5)  Color;  6)  Married or Widowed;  7)  Place of Birth;  8)  Father of foreign birth;  9)  Mother of foreign birth;  10)  the month in which the person died;  11)  profession, occupation or trade;  12) disease or  "Cause of Death" column.  In many cases, what apparently was written by the enumerator was crossed out and replaced by more non-descriptive medical terms.  Frequently, the transcribers have chosen the "crossed out" portion.  Each county is listed separately in the book and follows the same paging system as found in the original. The 13-page index covers nearly 2,300 names.   Price: $10
 
Other volumes are available in this series of Illinois County Census indexes.  Watch for future issues of this newsletter as they are reprinted, collated and stapled.  Many more will be available soon.  Pat 
Thank you for taking the time and making the effort to check out these offerings.  These books may be very helpful and we have been praised by others for the care and attention given to all of them.  They form a great checking background for Ancestry.com and Heritage Quest.  Remember to call me, Pat, at 1-800-419-0200 when you find one you wish to order.  Pat from YOGS.


 

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