Logo

Order Catalog e-mail

^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*
Hello! Welcome to YOGS Crate Crazy Sales

 Past newsletters are be available here for your reading convenience.  At the present time we cannot make the one-of-a-kind sale books available for on-line ordering. So if you see something here you like be sure to call the shop at 1-800-419-0200 or 317-862-3330 to check for availability and ordering.


Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe Newsletter

 Newsletter Subtitle:  BOOKS YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN ON THIS  

NEWSLETTER BEFORE, BECAUSE I HAVE NEVER HAD THEM

TO REVIEW BEFORE!  ALMOST NEW BOOKS, TOO!  JUNE 14, 2011 

YE OLDE GENEALOGIE SHOPPE

9605 VANDERGRIFF ROAD

POST OFFICE BOX 39128

INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46239

 

WEBSITE: https://WWW.YOGS.COM 

e-mail us at pat@yogs.com or orders@yogs.com

 

Call us at: 1-800-419-0200 if your call concerns an order you wish to place, or one for

which you have inquiries or questions about delivery times, delivery confirmation,  

insurance for your package or post office issues.

 

If you wish to ask genealogically oriented questions, need help with a genealogy  

problem or wish to use our Genealogists Help Line, please use the office number  

which is 317-862-3330.

 

Shipping and handling rates remain the same at $5 for each package (a $2 discount

under the website rate for newsletter subscribers only.) 

 

These are some great books!  I have never done a review of any of these before on this

newsletter BECAUSE i HAVE NEVER HAD THESE BOOKS BEFORE!

 

We have a brand new contributor to this crate:  so all books belonging to this lady will

be titled PK crates, and there will be, at this time, only two of them, PK01 today's crate  

and PK02 that will come out this Friday, if I have time to get it ready,  Let's get right to

these crates right now!  I will tell you these books are in great shape and have  

bviously been well stored and kept free of marks, highlighting and other abuses.   

They are very clean and tightly bound.  I will tell you if they have anything that makes

them look less than new.

 

PK CRAZY CRATE PK01 - BOOK 1: AMERICAN NATURALIZATION RECORDS 1790-1990

What They Are and How to Use Them. Heritage Quest, 1998.  127 pages, laminated  

heavy cardstock covers, indexed, wrapper style covers.  Title page has remnants of a  

stamp, which says, in light ink "Hopelessly Hooked Genealogist". [ I think most of us  

can relate to that one!]  Beneath the stamp she has neatly used a black marker to  

obscure her name and protect her privacy.  You can add your name in the blank space  

under the stamp.By John J. Newman, who has forty years of genealogical researching

expertise.  The author is a native of Milwaukee, WI, and holds a Master's Degree in

American History from IndianaUniversity. 

He spent sixteen years as our IndianaState Archivist before transferring to the Indiana  

Supreme Court where his abilities were fully utilized with his position as Director of

Information Management Services for the Indiana Supreme Court.  

He has lectured widely to local, regional and national Genealogical Societies.  As an  

archivist he knows that the more thoroughly that one understands the "why and the  

how" public records are kept, the more successful their research can be.   

Understanding the procedures an immigrant underwent to become a citizen is critical  

to determining what to look for and where to find it.  By appreciating the total record

keeping process, you will be better able to locate all records created on that immigrant

relative-not just the obvious ones.PRICE:  new-$12.95.  This lightly used copy $10.

 

PK CRAZY CRATE PK01 - BOOK 2:  THE BRISTOL REGISTERS OF SERVANTS SENT  

TO FOREIGN PLANTATIONS 1654-1686.  By Peter Wilson Coldham.1988 by the author.

491 pages, 6" by 9", hardbound with nice, clean dust jacket and indexed.  In the late  

1600s the port of Bristol, England, enjoyed a monopoly of the trade with Virginia and

the West Indies.  The trade in indentured servants, in particular, was especially heavy

at this time, but there was so much fraud in the trade that the Bristol City Council  

passed an ordnance in 1654 requiring that a register of servants destined for the  

colonies be kept, the purpose being to discourage "spiriting".  The infamous practice  

of coercing or duping innocent youths into servitude was wrong.  The registers of  

servant's indentures were bound into two volumes, dated 1654 to 1679, while from  

1679 to 1686 details of the servants were written into a rough book called Names and  

Apprentices.  Together, these books comprise the largest body of indenture records  

known and are an invaluable and unique record of English emigration to the American  

Colonies.  Of the total of 10,000 servants recorded in the Bristol Registers, all but a  

handful came from the West Country, the West Midlands, or from Wales. 

 

Four indexes have been included:  1. Servants, 2.) Ship's Masters, 3.) Places of Origin,  

4.) Ships.

 

Since you are going to be meeting this term often in this book, a note of explanation for  

the name- YEOMAN is being given here:  1.) An experienced man capable of keeping

accounts of supplies and costs;  2,) a farmer who tills his own small acreage; 3.) a  

person who can be counted on to work diligently, 4. A clerk or writer [lawyer] in the navy.   

 

Details of each entry vary, of course, but most entries give:

1. The Name of the Servant,

2.) His Place of Origin,

3.) Length of Service,

4.) Destination [usually Virginia, Maryland, or the West Indies,]

5.) After 1670 it includes the name of the ship.   

Some samples follow: 

1.) Thomas, son of Thomas Ree of Upper Warren, Worc[ester], Yeoman to William  

Willett of Bristol, merchant, 8 yrs. Virginia.

2.) John Lewes of Newport, Pembroke, yeoman, to Edward Child, of Bristol, pewterer,  

4 years.

3.) John Miles of Whaddon, sergeweaver, to William Curtis 4 yrs, New England by  

Boston Merchant, said William Curtis, M[aster]

4.) Susanna, wife of John Miles, to above 4 yrs New England by Boston Merchant.  

 

Each one of these also comes with a date, omitted here because of space  

considerations.

The indexes begin on page 389 and run to 491.

Surnames of indentured servants that have four or more first names are listed here:  

Abbott, Ad(d)ams, Allen, Anderson, Andrew(e)s, Arnold, Ash, Atkins, Attwood, Aust(e/i)n..

Avery, Ayleworth, [Baily/Bayly, Bayley,] Baker, Baldwin, Ball, Barber, Barnes, Barnett,  

Barrett, Bartlett, Bassett, Ba(t)chelor, Beale, Beard, Bennett, B(a/e)rnard, Berry, Bev(a/i)n,

Bick, Bird, Bishop, Blake, Bo(u)lton, Bond, Bowd(e/o)n, Bow(e/i)n, Bowles, Bradford,  

Bradshaw, Bra(i/y)ne, Brewer, Br(i/y)an, Briant, Britt(e/i/o)n, Brook/e, Brook(e)s, Browne,

Browning, Bull, Burgess, Burt, Be(ur/our)ton, Bush, But(t)ler, Cad(ell/le), Carter, Car(e)y,  

Chamberla(i/y)n/e, Chambers, Chandler, Chapman, Chapp(el/le), Charles, Child, Church,

Churchill, Clarke, Clement, Cobb, Cole, Coleman, Co(a)les, Collins, Combe, Combes,  

Cooke, Cooper, Cornish, Cott(e/o)n, Court, Cousins/Cozens, Cox, Creed, Crocker,

Crow, Crumpe, Cuffe, Curtis, Dale, Daniell, Darby, David, Davi(e)s, [Davy/ Davey Davie,]  

Day, Deane, [Denham/Dennum], Dennis, Dick(e)s/Dix, Dowle, Drake, Drew, Dunn, Dyer,  

Earle, Edmunds, Edwards, Elliott, Ellis, England, English, Evan, Evans, Everett, Farmer,  

Felton, Field, Fisher, Fletcher, Flower, Floyd, Fluellen, Floyd, Fo(a/o)rd, Foster, Fowler,  

Francis, Franklin, Freeman, Fry, Fuller, Ga(y)le, Gard(e/i)ner, George, Gibbon/s, Gibbs,  

Gilbert, Giles, Gill, Gold, Good, Goodw(e/i)n, Gough, Granger, Gray, Green/e, Gregory,  

Griff(e/i)n, Griff(e/i)th, Griffiths, Gunn, [Gwin/Gwynne, Ha(i/y)nes, Hale, Hall, Hancock,  

Harbert, Harding, Harper, Harris, Harrison, Harry, Hart, Harvey, Haskins, Hawkes,  

Hawkins, Hayward, Hellier, Herne, Hew(l)ett, Hi(cks/x), Higgins, Higgs, Hill,  

Hitch(en/ing)s, Hobson, Hodges, Holbrooke, Ho(u)lder, Ho(l)mes, Hooke, Hooper,  

Hopkins, Horton, Ho(u/w)se, Howard, Howell, Hugh(e)s, Hull, Humphr(eys/is), Hunt,  

Iles, Jackson, Jacob, James, Jeffer(ies/ys/is), Jenkin, J(e/i)nkins, (G/J)ennings, John,

Johns, Johnson, Jo(a)nes Wow: over 3 columns!), Kelly, Kenner, Kent, Kerswell, King,  

Knight, Lamb, Lane, Langford, Langley, Lawrence, Lee/Lea/Leigh/ Ley, Legg,  

Lewis/Lewes, Llewellin, Lloyd and Long.  I would have done more, but time is short!

Lots more books to do.  Need to stop here.  [It is somehow satisfying to know that they

had their difficulties in the 1600s with the spelling of these names, just as we do today,  

isn't it?] PRICE: new was $30  slighty used is $24

 

PK CRAZY CRATE PK01 - BOOK 3:  SCOTS ON THE CHESAPEAKE 1607-1830.  

Compiled by David Dobson.  Genealogical Publishing Company, 1992.  169 pages,

6" by 9:, indexed, hardbound.  There has been a Scottish element in the population  

around the Chesapeake since the founding of Jamestown in 1607.  There were  

probably only about 200 who were there by 1645.  When Oliver Cromwell exiled 900

Scots prisoners of war around 1650, the numbers in America began to grow as he sent

his political prisoners here.  The Voyage of the Golden Lion of Dundee established

settlement links as early as 1626, but the British, with their "Navigation Acts" to limit  

access during the 1660s had the effect of making the trade between Scotland and the  

English Colonies illegal.  During those years the Scots Government followed the  

English practice of transporting criminals, religious and political "undesirables" to the

American plantations.  Many of these people were Covenanters-militant Presbyterians  

who opposed the Stuart Kings.  Not all of these prisoners made it to America.  In 1679

over two hundred of these Covenanters went down with the ship, Crown of London, in

a storm off the Orkney Islands. In 1689 when William and Mary acceded to the thrones  

of Scotland and England, this period ended.  With the demise of the Episcopal Church  

in Scotland, many of the ministers left to take jobs in Virginia and Maryland as tutors,  

schoolmasters and ministers.  When Scotland and England created their political union

in 1707, that solved much of the problem, and the ships again began to travel between  

the two countries.  The rapid growth of the tobacco trade sped everything up.  By 1740  

Glasgow had dominated that trade, so there were Scottish merchants, factors, and their

servants throughout the regions.  With the success of the American Revolution, our  

ships no longer needed to go to a British port.  They could freely land at any major  

European port.  Probate courts, court records, indenture agreements, jail registers,

family papers, newspapers and magazines, naturalization papers, Loyalist claims,

church records, militia papers, gravestone inscriptions government documents and  

census returns were scanned for clues. Page xv should be photo-copied first as it is

your key to what 21 different abbreviations used herein mean!  With fifteen to twenty  

entries on each page, you can see the value of this book.  I will list a few of the entries,

so you will have an idea of what you may find in this book.   

 Here are some samples! 

1.)  GIBSON James, merchant, res[idence] Glasgow, sett[led] Pungataigue Creek, Accomack Co., VA  pre 1731. (SRO.AC which stands for Scottish Record Office. Edinburgh.)   

 

2.) HAY, W. s[on] of James Hay, lawyer, edu[cated] Glasgow Uni[versity, res[idence]  

Kilsyth, Lanarkshire. Sh[ipped] 18 July 1768, fr[om] Greenock, Renfrewshire, to VA  

arr[ived] Norfolk, VA 16 Sep. 1768. d. 1825 VA WMQ.15.8) (MAGU79) William & Mary

Quarterly, Volume 15, page 8. Matriculation Albums of Glasgow University 1727-1858.  

West. Indies. Addison 1913.  

3.)INNES, ROBERT,  s[on] of Robert Innes and Margaret Sproule, clergyman, edu[cated]

King's College, Aberdeen, sh[ipped] 1677 to VA. (F.6.359-Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae. H

Scott, Edinburgh.

4.) IRVINE, FANNY, b[orn] 1796, sett[led] Maryland and Wood Co, VA, mother of Thereas,

William, Maria, Melina, Frances and Tabitha.  [N. A. Microfilm 432/277-299. National  

Archives.] 

Every source for the information found in this book is keyed to the information printe

than is printed here.  Some lead to wills, newspaper articles, public records, etc.   

Some are long, some are short, but this book may be the only place you will ever see

this notation.  PRICE:  $20

 

PK CRAZY CRATE PK01 - BOOK 4:  THE SCOTS-IRISH IN THE CAROLINAS.  By Billy  

Kennedy. 1997.  The third in a series of Scots-Irish Chronicles by the author, who is  

the assistant editor of the Ulster/Belfast News Letter - Northern Ireland's leading

morning newspaper having been founded in 1737.  Ambassador Press, 207 pages,  

5 " by 8", laminated covers, indexed and softbound.   The Carolina regions of the

USA were settled in large numbers during the 18th Century by tens of thousands of

Ulster-Scots Presbyterians, who left their native shores for reasons of religious

persecution and economic deprivation.  The hardy Scots-Irish who tamed the  

wilderness fill this book.  The author starts his journey from the north of Ireland to the  

port of Charleston, SC. And the Carolina piedmont [foot of the mountain], along the  

Great Wagon Road from Pennsylvania, through the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia,

into the western highlands of North Carolina, and down to the historic Waxhaws,

where President Jackson spent his childhood and early youth.  Besides the historical

background certain families are covered in more detail.  Interesting chapters among  

others in this book, which is a great read, by the way, are: Early Movement to America;  

American Presidents from the Carolinas, The Scotch-Irish Roots of President Jimmy

Carter; Covenanting Stock who Peopled the Carolinas; Journey to America (for four  

shillings and eight pence) and the Settlement of the Hearst Family; 'Poor Calvinists' in  

Williamsburg; The Moores of Walnut Grove and heroine Kate Berry; From County  

Antrim to Fairview, SC; The formidable John C. Calhoun; the Kings of the Wild Frontier;

Arthur Dobbs - Founding Father of NC; Native Indians of the Southeast; Watauga;  

Typical Ulster-Irish Families covered in lots of detail: Andersons, Brownlees, Caldwells,

Catheys, Copelands, Cochrans, Culbertsons, Erwins, Hamiltons, Hanveys, Hills,  

Hunters, Joneses, Kennedys, Knoxes, McClurkins, McGinleys, the Morrisons, the  

Porters, the Reids, the Ritcheys/Ritchies, the Seawrights, the Sherards, the Speers and

the Wallaces. Plus County Down Colonies in Virginia and South Carolina.  There is  

ncredible detail as this author traced the families from Ireland to where they settled in  

America.  A journey we genealogists want to take in reverse!  PRICE $20

 

PK CRAZY CRATE PK01 - BOOK 5:  IRELAND AND THE IRISH. A Short History.  By  

Karl S. Bottigheimer.  1982, Columbia University Press, 301 pages, indexed, dust

jacket (being almost 30 years old, this colorful dust jacket is not pristine, nor is it in the  

least shabby.  The top front and back are slightly curled outward, the top and bottom  

have an occasional 1/8" split, This book jacket has been well-cared-for and is flat with

no wrinkles or creases.  The black magic marker has covered three lines of name and  

address on the inside front page.  The author teaches English and Irish History at the  

StateUniversity of New York at Stony Brook.  This is his third book.  This author ably  

covers Ireland's rich and complex past of over 5,000 years.  He drew on church  

records, art and archeological evidence to illustrate the prehistoric era, the heroic age

of Celt, Viking and Norman conquests, and the world of early Christianity.  He explores

the development of a distinctive Irish culture and society during the Middle Ages, the

Tudor conquest of the sixteenth century, the establishment and rule of a Protestant  

Ascendancy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and the resurgence of a  

Catholic Ireland in the nineteenth century.  The author then delineates the turbulent  

formation of the modern Irish state and chronicles both its glories and its frustrations,   

The Irish experience is shown geographically in its European and worldwide setting.  

Early waves of immigrants to Ireland and later waves of Irish emigrants abroad are

given a prominent place in the overall picture.  This book is distinguished by its  

breadth both geographically and chronologically.  It will deepens your interest in, and  

knowledge of, the land so many of our ancestors left long ago to build a new life here.  

 PRICE: new was $19.95.  This copy gently used $16

 

PK CRAZY CRATE PK01 - BOOK 6:  THE MELUNGEONS.   Notes on the Origin of a

Race.  Revised Edition.  1992 by the author.  By Bonnie Ball, The Overmountain

Press, 114 pages, 5 " by 8 ", softbound with colorful covers on slick heavy paper.  

Mrs. Ball is quite familiar with the Melungeon peoples.  Two families lived on her  

father's farm, and worked with him, and she taught Melungeon children in the local  

Schools since she taught in Scott, Dickinson and BuchananCounties in Tennessee.  

This ethnological study is both scholarly and highly readable.  The author traces,  

objectively, the roots of one of America's more obscure peoples.  Numerous theories  

exist for the origin of these people, who were not black nor white nor Indian.  In this  

work the author discusses the various theories, their strengths and weaknesses, and  

the multiple possibilities.  These theories include the roles of Sir Walter Raleigh's  

"Lost Colony", shipwrecked Portuguese sailors, followers of Spain's Fernando de  

Soto who were left behind in America, various Native American Tribes, and black  

slaves in the Melungeon ancestry.  The author has also included a comprehensive list  

of "Some Suggested Reading" to provide the broadest possible range of information.  

This work is a must-have for anyone interested in early Appalachian history and the  

Ethnic development of America.   Original PRICE was $10, now only $8.

 

PK CRAZY CRATE PK01 - BOOK 7: SCOTTISH HIGHLANDERS ON THE EVE OF THE  

GREAT MIGRATION 1725-1775.  THE PEOPLE OF ARGYLL.  By David Dobson.  2005

by the author.  Clearfield Company, 2005.  137 pages plus the 1714 map, by Hermann

Moll of Northern England showing the Western Islands.  5 " by 8 " slick coated  

covers in black & white. Wrappers.  The next map is of Modern Argyll showing the  

parishes, etc.  From the Introduction by the author:  "Emigration from Scotland to  

colonial America, which had been small scale during the seventeenth century, became  

significant during the eighteenth century.  Much of this exodus originated in the

Highlands of Scotland where the traditional social and economic structures were

beginning to break down under pressure from the Commercial and the Industrial

Revolutions which were occurring in both England and Lowland Scotland.  Profits

were to be made by supplying raw materials and foodstuffs to the growing factory

towns.  Clan chiefs increasingly abandoned their patriarchal role in favor of becoming  

capitalist landlords, and the traditional social fabric of the Highlands was soon in

tatters.  This social breakdown was alsointensified through the failure of the Jacobite  

cause in 1746 followed by the military occupation and repression that occurred in the

Highlands in the aftermath of Culloden.  The absorption of thegreat Highland  

landowners and clan chiefs into the British elite ultimately resulted in farm rents being  

increased to enable the landowners to maintain their new life styles.  Voluntary emigrants

bound for North Carolina and New York, and others from Inverness were bound for  

Georgia.  In 1746 the British Government dispatched about one thousand Jacobites,  

prisoners of war, in or prisoners in chains were sent as indentured servants bound for the colonies." 

The History lesson continues with details of when and where, but the majority of this

book is the actual lists of the people involved which follows this two-page history

lesson.  This book is designed to identify the kind of material that is available in the  

absence of church records and will supplement the church records when they are  

available.  The materials in this book just deal with Argyll,  thereby limiting the

broadness of the items which needed to be found, compiled, indexed and made  

available.  Mr. Dobson, already famous worldwide for his ability to find and properly

compile information on these Scottish families, has now refined his research  

to the point he has zeroed in on how it needs to be done from there, not here.  The  

readers of his books are deeply grateful when they find what he has located for them.  

You will feel he has been of tremendous help to everyone searching in vain for  

information on our side of the Atlantic, and finding little, if you find your immigrant  

ancestor in this book!  Every source is cited, so you can follow up on the information.   

 

Scottish Highlanders 1725-1775: Argyll.  Here are a few samples so you can see what  

you get:  [Caution:  When you see the same name, they may or may not be the same  

person.  Also, if you see more than one entry for the same name, they may or may not  

all apply to the same person, but two or more of them could be the same person!   

Sending for the original copies should help you sort them out and solve the problem.]

1.) ALEXANDER - John, on the Isabelle and Mary, 1767. NAS.AC20.2.24 [National

Archives of SCOTLAND, Edinburgh. Adniralty Court]

2.) CAMERON, Angus, lately in Ardgour, horse thief, admonished, 1731 JRA [The  

Justicary Records of Argyll and the Isles, Volume II, 1705-1742. [Edinburgh 1969]

3.) BROWN, Mary, eldest daughter of the late Robert Brown, merchant in Inveraray,  

eldest son of the late William Brown former Provost of Inveraray, assignation date

4.) CAMERON, Archibald, born 1707, brother of John Cameron, tacksman [a lease

holder or gentleman farmer] of Conglen, 1731.

5.) FLETCHER, John, in Scobull, to go with Archibald McLean of Lochbuie to America  

as a soldier in 1775. [ NAS G[ifts] & D [eposits]I-174.2096]

Many of these entries say -"was admitted as a burgess" or(accepted as a citizen?)  

There are about 18-20 entries  of various information  on each page.   

 

Surnames with four (,) or more (#) first names are listed here.  Alexander, Bell, Blair 5,  

Brown 17, Bruce, Buchanan 5, Calder 7, Cameron 46, Campbell [ pg 7 has one, pg 34

has one, all pages in between have approximately 36 Campbells each.] Carmichael 18,  

Clark 5, Clerk 11, Crawford, Dallas, Douglas, Duncanson 11, Ferguson 15, Fisher 16,  

Fleming 7, Fletcher 6, Forbes, Fraser 9, Fullerton 7, Galbraith 7, Galbreath 7, Gilchrist 7,  

Gillies 12, Graham 19, Hamilton, Hunter 6, Hyndman 5, Jamieson, Johnston 6, Kennedy

6, Lambie, Lamont 11, Lindsay, Livingstone, [Pat's note: all the Mc names were in

uppercase letters in the book, so I chose to do the same because it saved time.  

 MCALESTER 19, MCALPINE 7, MCARTHUR 37, MCAULAY, MCBRADDON,

MCCALLUM 21, MCCALMAN, MCCOLL 7, MCCOWIG 12, MCCUAIG 10, MCMURRIE

MCDONALD 44, MCDOUGALD 21, MCDOUGALL 23, MCDUFFIE, MCDUGALD 21,

MCEACHARN, MCEACHERN 5, MCEACHRAN 5, MCEWAN 5, MCEWEN 6, MCFARLAN 5,

MCFARLANE 12, MCGIBBON 9, MCGILCHRIST 11, MCGREGOR 7, MCILBR(I/Y)DE

MCINNES 6, MCINNISH, MCINTAGGART, MCINTYRE 57, MCKAY10, MCKELLAR 23,  

MCKENDRICK, MCKENZIE 5, MCKILLOP, MCKINNON 17, MCLACHLAN 35, MCLAREN,  

MCLARTY 6, MCLAUCHLAN 11, MCLAURIN, MCLAURINE, MCLEAN 118, MCLEOD 8,

MCLERGEN, MCMATH 8, MCMILLAN 32, MCMURCH(IE/Y) 5, MCNAB/B 20, MCNAKAIRD,

MCNAUGHT(A/O)N 7, MCNEIL/L 81, MCNICOL/L 11, MCNIVEN 6, MCNOKAIRD

MCPHERSON 12, MCPHIE 11, MCPHUN/E, MCQUAR(IE/Y) 15, MCTAGGART 5, MCTAVISH  

10, MCVICAR 17, MCVOURI(C/S)H 9, MCVURICH 13, MCWILLIAM, Mitchell,  

Montgomer(ie/y) 9,  Munro/e 15, Murray 6, Ochiltree 5, Orr, Paterson 6, Reid,

Robertson 5, Schaw, Sim(p)son 7, Sinclair 13, Smith 24, Stevenson 7, Stewart 56,

Sutherland 6, Thomson 9, Turner 5, Watson 8, and Wh(i/y)te 4.  PRICE: $13.50

Wait until you see what is coming on Friday or next Tuesday when PK02 comes out.  We have Maryland and Pennsylvania,  Virginia and a North Carolina County Atlas and a two-volume set by Charles Hanna.  These are great books! 
Pat from YOGS    

***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***

Thanks for taking the time to check out our crates.

We really appreciate those people who are willing to give our books a second chance to be helpful.  Who knows?  Maybe the one you have been looking for will be on this crate or the next crate.  Blend this research with your census and courthouse research and see how your family puzzle can grow to be more complete!

 

Click here to Return to the Crazy Crates Main Page

 

Email Newsletter icon,
                  E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List
                  icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter
 
Copyright 1999 - 2011 Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe.