Logo

Order Catalog e-mail

^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*^*
Hello! Welcome to YOGS Crate Crazy Sales

 Past newsletters are be available here for your reading convenience.  At the present time we cannot make the one-of-a-kind sale books available for on-line ordering.  So if you see something here you like be sure to call the shop and order it.

 Newsletter Subtitle:  PAT'S SOAPBOX and WHAT CAN WE GET FROM THE W.P.A.? 

Month Day Year: APRIL 5, 2011 

 

CRAZY CRATE YOGS 93:  TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 2011:  WHAT IS THE WPA AND WHAT CAN WE FIND IN IT TO HELP US?

 

[PAT'S SOAPBOX - THOUGHTS ON THE WORLD]

 

TODAY'S books were prepared by the [W.P.A.] Works Progress Administration for many of Indiana's and other state's counties as a work project to alleviate the pain of unemployment.  People were employed, taught to type and put to work, and paid a salary!  This was a project Franklin Delano Roosevelt was smart enough to initiate during the last great depression in the 1930s to give everyone in America a skill that business owner's would be happy to pay good money for after the depression began to lift! 

 

The unemployed were taught how to organize and type onto paper vast quantities of data, providing indexed books for the County Clerk's Offices and the Department of Vital Statistics Offices that have saved time and effort for every County Clerk's Office and Vital Statistics Office since then, right up to, and including, today.

 

The organization of data and typing skills gave every person who learned how, skills that were desperately needed in our fast growing business economy.  It furnished the person who applied for the job an alternative to starvation or welfare, both of which were an anathema [something that is intensely disliked] by people with pride.

 

Any job or useful skill that would be appropriate for a business career was the path to satisfaction, independence and self-sufficiency.  The people employed by the WPA organized and typed the INDEXES TO: birth, marriage and death records, among hundreds of other things, for certain time frames, and they worked in the counties of many of the states. 

 

This project and the Civilian Conservation Corp, which taught young men and women the necessary construction skills needed to build cabins, homes, and buildings, to design, build and lay out roads and hiking trails in our state and national parks which gave these young men the skills needed to take part in the greatest building boom our country has ever known. The fruits of their labors are still being enjoyed in many of our parks today. 

 

Then came World War Two.  The men joined the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard.  They accepted the challenge of protecting our country virtually all over the world.  Our women left their homes to take the jobs the men had done up until then; and Rosie the Riveter became the poster girl for a new age, where women held jobs, and supported the family while their men were fighting overseas. Some women even picked up the fighting skills to help the men "Save the World for Democracy!"

 

When the war was over, these men came home, many reclaimed their jobs, or qualified for even better ones, depending on the skills they had learned during the war. Some began college under the G. I Bill to study and earn a degree of their choice.  Some of the women went back to being wives and mothers keeping home fires burning, and helping add to the family payroll and our country's work force in huge numbers. 

 

Many inventions made before, during and after the war needed buildings and factories to be built in, and then to be used in and worked in, and doing paperwork became a full-time job for many people.  These labor-saving devices invented before, during and after the war and their production made jobs for thousands of people.

 

The numbers on the unemployment rolls dropped, people's pride in their ability to earn an income and be self-supporting, turned our young men's and women's thoughts to marriage and family and started our country on the greatest developmental boom ever seen. 

 

Our schools picked up this WPA good idea and instituted classes in dozens of different skill sets as vocational training and the next generation grew up with Home Economics classes, typing classes, bookkeeping classes, science -researching skills, higher math skills, higher English standards for more formal writing, wood-working shop classes, architectural drawing, agricultural classes, shop classes in metal working, automobile repair, and construction classes. 

 

These graduates became the "DO-IT-YOURSELF" GENERATION, THEY WERE NOT AFRAID TO TACKLE ANYTHING!   

 

The next generation learned in high school how to choose a skill, hone their abilities, and learn how to work: how to do something they liked and could make money doing it for those that either couldn't, or didn't want to, do such things for themselves. 

 

However, we needed a way to keep the kids in school longer, and since the next generation down, probably had fewer chores at home to teach them a good work ethic, and teaching them to participate as a contributing member in the family fell prey to busy mothers knowing it took less time to do the chore than to teach a reluctant child to do it properly. About the only thing that interested them was Sports and the Band and Music Department Classes.

 

The Sports have survived just fine.  Every second grader wants to be a Star Athlete, a Professional Ballplayer that plays forty games a year and makes a million dollars, or more, for each one of them.  We have taught our children to win, maybe, too well!  And because we did not want our children to feel bad, we made winners out of everyone!  From everybody got a sticker on their paper to everyone that participated got a ribbon or a trophy, we taught our children that it was "bad" to fail, when often that is the best motivation for positive improvement.

 

Now most of these classes are taught in special schools adapted to giving professional credits even up to the Associate Degree Level.  Sadly these classes are not available to all of our young people who badly need to learn skills that someone will pay them to do before they leave high school!  They graduate from High School with few workable skills which will enable them to apply for, get and keep a job.

 

Sadly, these classes have pretty much disappeared from our high schools as are the Physical Education, Music and Art  classes which developed, natural talents into something worth looking at and listening to that are now disappearing from our schools under the guise of "Budget Concerns."  

 

Now it is perfectly within the realm of possibility that we are graduating students, who taught themselves how to play video games with increasing skill, but other than that know how to do very little else!  Watching TV is not a skill that too many young people can make a living by doing, the computer skills we are teaching them often do not transfer to anything but game playing or social uses which may not be applicable to business uses for which it would be worth hiring and paying them a salary to do.    

 

Just think, if President Obama had put our unemployed to work bringing those birth, marriage and death certificate copying skills into data bases up to the year 2000, we would really have something to show for the monies paid out to the unemployed.  A revived Civilian Conservation Corp would have taught young people to build and make the world a better place for all of us to live.  Our homeless servicemen would have places to live where job skills could be taught daily as they learned the world can be a better place if we all help each other.  Increased self-reliance, better work skills, pride in a job well done, would have been better for the vast number of the unemployed that literally were unable to do much of anything but grow older at taxpayer expense.  Many of them have no skills now that would make an employer want to hire them.  If we had worked them, instead of just paying them to be unemployed, they could take pride and purpose in all that they had done! 

 

All genealogists understand how valuable a collection of these W.P.A. Records are.  I have a complete set of these for Indiana, on site, and I have many of them from which I can copy just one surname, or in some cases, the entire book.

 

Here's a sample of two of them:

 

YOGS 93  BOOK 1:  WASHINGTON COUNTY, INDIANA BIRTH RECORDS 1882-1920. 

253 pages, cardstock covers with clear plastic sheets overlaid both front and back, punched binding, plastic heat-sealed with a black plastic strip binding.  PRICE:  $25.  Reduced to $18 because the printing copy of this book is very light and not always centered on the page.        

 

Format includes:  (1.) Child's Name, (2.) Father's Given Name, (3.) Mother's Given and Maiden Name, (4.) Sex M(ale) or F(emale), (5.) Color, W(hite), B(lack), M[ulatto) (6.) Date of Birth - month, date, year, (7.) Designation of Book, (8.) Page number in book.

 

Sample:(1.)  Abbott, Agnes May, (2.) Lester, (3.) Florence Bierly, (4.) F, (5.) W (6.) Apr 23, 1913, (7. )H-10, (8.) Page 31.  

 

Abstract of Surnames beginning with A with actual number of births listed:  Abbott 8, Abrahams 1, Adams 18, Adkins 2, Agin 11, Agaen 1, Agle 1, Akens 1, Akers 4, Albertson 14, Alberding 1, Alexander 42, Allen 50, Alspaugh 5, Alsup 2, Alseep 2, Altemeyer 3, Altman 1, Altmier 1, Alvis 4, Amey 2, Amy 1, Anderson 30, Andrew 5, Applegate 8, Arbuckle 3, Armstrong 18, Arnold 23, Arthur 1, Ashabraner 7, Ashabranner 4, Ashabram 1, Ashdroner 1, Atkenson 1, Atkins 1, Attemeyer 1, Attkinsson 5, and Avery 1.

 

Babbs 5, Babcock 2, Bagshaw 4, Bailey 4, Baker 74, Balding 1, Baldwin 1, Ballantine 7, Balin 1, Ball 5, Ballard 3, Bane 6, Baner 10, Banks 11, Barker 1, Barkley 1, Barkman 2, Barksdale 8, Barnard 6, Barnett 27, Barrett 33, Barth 2, Bartle 4, Bartlett 2, Bartsch 7, Baston 1, Batman 1, Batt 20, Baxter 8, Baynes 26, Beal 7, Beard 4, Beck 16, Bell 12, Bellows 6, Bennett 11, Benson 2, Berkey 10, Berkhart 2, Berth 2, Bestwick 6, Bethuram 1, Biddin 1, Bierly 15, Bilyou 5, Bird 2, Birdsong 2, Birth 6, Bishop 25, Bixler 5, Black 17, Blackman 9, Blackwood 4, Blankenbaker 13, Blevins 11, Bluehart 1, Blunt 12, Board 1, Boardman 2, Boaz 2, Bobbie 1, Bobbitt 4, Bobo 4, Bocock 3, Boggle 1, Boggs 21, Boling 29, Bowers 43, Bowling 1, Bowman 5, Boyd 2, Boyer 1, Box 1, Bradley 10, Bradshaw 5, Brannaman 34, Brannock 1, Brengle 3, Bressie 2, Brewer 61, Brickey 12, Bridgewater 29, Bright 2, Bringle 4, Brim 4, Briscoe 15, Broadley 3, Brock 8, Brooks 6, Brough 16, Brown 106, Brun 1, Bruner 1, Brunson 7, Bryan 6, Bryant 33, Buchanan 8, Bullington 6, Bunch 2, Bundy 32, Burns 1, Burgess 3, Burkhart 4, Burrell 8, Burton 3, Bush 44, Butterfield 4, Buttorff 6, Byerley 3, and Byrd 1.

 

Cadle 4, Cain 5, Calahan 3, Caldwell 3, Callahan 4, Callaway 18, Calvert 3, Campbell 20, Carlile 11, Carman 3, Carmichael 1, Carr 3, Carter 20, Cartwright 8, Carwin 1, Casey 14, Caspar 2, Cathcart 37, Cauble 77, Caves 6, Cease 2, Chamberlain 3, Chambers 7, Chaney 13, Chappell 1, Charles 7, Chase 2, Chastain 101, Chastine 6, Chenoweth 7, Child 2, Childers 13, Christ 1, Christwell 1, Churchman 6, Churchwell 1, Clark 39, Clarke 9, Clegg 11, Clements 6, Click 5, Clifton 1, Clinton 3, Clipp 4, Clouse 1, Coalman 3, Coats 5, Cochran 1, Coffee 9, Coffman 4, Cogswell 1, Coker 4, Coldwell 1, Cole 11, Coleman 3, Colglazier 79, Collier 24, Collins 13, Colwell 9, Combs 7, Compton 3, Conner 2, Connor 2, Conway 4, Cook 12, Cooley 5, Coombs 10, Cooper 27, Coots 4, Corn 9, Cornwell 22, Corwin 4, Coulter 8, Cowherd 4, Cox 8, Crabb 1, Crandall 4, Crane 13, Cravens 20, Crim 8, Criswell 26, Crockett 7, Cromer 8, Cunningham 12, Cuppy 2, Curry 7, Curtis 13, and Cypson 1.

 

Dael 1, Dailey 5, Daily 12, Daleure, Dalure 1, Dalton 10, Danah 1, Daniels 5, Darah 1, Darcus 1, Darhield 1, Darne 1, Darnelson 1, Darrah 5, Drrow 2, Daugherty 5, Davis 78, Dawalt 12, Dawling 1, Dawson 1, Day 8, Deal 2, Dean 7, Deckert 1, DeCorrey 1, DeCovery 1, De(e)fendorf 2, DeFord 7, Deihl 1, Dellman 1, DeJean 1, Delure 1, Denanny 1, Denney 7, Denny 27, Dennenny 1, Dennis11, Dentn 1, Denton `11, DePew 4, Der(e)miah 11, Devenish 1, Dewalt 2, Dewees 3, Deweese 9, Dewitt 2, Dickmyer 1, Diedrick 1, Diefondorf 1, Diehl 2, Dietz 1, Dismore 5, Dixon 1, Doan 7, [Following alphabication is as listed in book:] Dodge 2, Dodson 1, Dobbins 22, Dobins 1, Dobson 1, Doherty 1, Dolens 1, Dolling 1.] Dome 1, Donahon 1, Done 1, Dons 1, Dooley 1, Dorsey 7, Dotts 5, Doughlass 1, Dougherty 2, Dowel 1, Dowling 25, Down 2, Doyle 3, Drager 1, Drayer 2, Dreger 1, Driscoll 1, Driscell 1, Driskel(l) 3, Duckwall 1, Duckwell 2, Dudley 1, Duff 7, Dun 1, Duncan 17, Dunn 2, Dunnihoe 2, Durham 1, Durnal 1, Durnell 1, and Durnil 19.

 

Eagle 1, Eaglin 1, Eakes 1, Earley 5, Early 14, Easton 1, Eaton 1, Edens 1, Eddelman 2, Edmison 1, Edmonson 1, Edwards 5, Egelan 1, Egeland 1, Eichorn 3, Eiler 2, Elgin 10, Eliott 5, Elrod 1, Elliott 46, Elliot 9, Ellis 14, Elrod 33, El(l)wood 8, Em(e/o)ry 18, Engleman 1, England 1, Enoch/s 4, Enteman 1, Erwood 4, Etzler 7, Evans 10, Eveline 1, and Ewing 1. 

 

Fan(c/s)he(a)r 12, Far(r)abee 4, Fasher 1, Faulkner 1, Fawbush 25, Feeler 1, Feiock 3, Ferabee 1, Ferguson 2, Ferree 2, Fessel/l 3, Fields 1, Fieldsoot 1, Fink 1, Fippen 4, Fischer 4, Fish 2, Fisher 15, Fitzpatrick 2, Flahart 1, Fleenor 77, Fleetwood 1, Fleming 1, Flinn 1, Floyd 18, Fletcher 5, Flynn 2, Follick 2, Fordice 4, Fordyce 2, Forrest 1, Fortney 1, Foster 7, Fouts 1, Frainer 2, Franklin 8, Frantz 1, Frederick 1, Free 2, Freed/e 11, Freeman 3, Frick 6, Fricke 7, Frickey 1, Frickie 2, Frost 4, Fulk 10, Fullmer 1, Fulton 1, Fultz 43, Funk 2, and Furnish 1.

 

IN YOGS 93  BOOK 2:  INDEX TO DEATH RECORDS,  GREENE COUNTY, INDIANA, 1893-1920. INCLUSIVE, LETTERS A TO Z INCLUSIVE.  W.P.A.

Compiled by the Indiana Works Progress Administration, 1939.  These original records were to be found in Book B and Book H in the County Recorder's Office in  Bloomfield, Indiana, as well as the City Health Offices in Book CH in Jasonville and Book CHO in Linton, Indiana.  This AccoPress bound book has 175 pages in it with approximately 45 names on each page.  They are printed on one side of the page only and this greatly increases clarity and makes for simpler and quicker reading.

 

FORMAT:  Columns read from left to right: (1.) Name of the Deceased. (2.) Sex: [M or F]. (3.)Color: [W(hite), B(lack) or M(ulatto) - [a person of mixed Caucasian and Negro ancestry.] (4.) Age at Death. For young children expressed in fractions - 3 months = 3/12.  For adults in years only 25.  (5.) Date of Death.  (6.) Place of Death.  Usually Town or Township.( 7).  Code Designation for Book and Office with Actual Record. (8.) Page Number.

 

SAMPLE:  (1.) Hixon, Eva (2.) F[emale] (3.) W[hite] (4.) 25 [years] (5.) July 22, 1912. (6.) Worthington. (7.) H-5 indicates Health Office at Bloomfield. Book 5.  (8.) Page 83.

 

Although this is not the same group of people who are in the first book above, we are going to pick up the alphabet with the surnames that begin with G:  Numbers following surnames indicate actual numbers of deaths in this time period for people with this surname.  

Gabbard 13, Gadberry 4, Gadbury 1, Gaddis 3, Gainey 1, Gall 2, Gallemor 1, Gambell 1, Gambill 6, Gamble 2, Gan 1, Gardner 9, Garey 1, Garlan 1, Garland 1, Garrett 2, Garrison 1, Garten 2, Garvin 1, Gaskill 2, Gastineau 4, Gaston 2, Geyak 1, Geary 1, Getches 2, Geddes 7, Gee 2, Gehring 2, Gelligan 1, Gentry 5, George 3, Gerkin 1, Gibson 9, Gilbert 2, Giles 1, Gill 1, Gillette 2, Gilliland 1, Gilmore 2, Giltner 4, Glasby 1, Glass 1, Glen 3, Glidden 4, Glough 1, Glover 2, Goad 5, Gobbert 2, Godberry 1, Godfrey 1, Godlin 1, Goldberg 1,Goldman 1, Goldy 1, Good 10, Goodman 15, Goodpasture 1, Goodson 3, Goodwin 6, Gorby 1, Gordon 6, Gowan 2, Grady 2, Graham 12, Grass 4, Graves 5, Gray 16, Green 11, Greene 4, Greenway 2, Greenwood 7, Gregg 2, Grey 5, Griffin 1, Griffith 16, Griggs 1, Grimes 2, Grisby 2, Grismore 2, Grizzle 1, Gromer 1, Ground 2, Grounds 3, Grove 3, Groves 8, Guim 1, Gunder 1, Gunn 1, Guthery 2, Guthrie 2, Gwartney 1, Gwinn 4, and Gydos 1.

 

Hadley 6, Haffley 2, Hagaman 1, Hagerman 2, Hahn 1, Haig 3, Hain 1, Haines 3, Hake 1, Halbert 1, Halderman 4, Hale 6, Hall 17, Hallers 1, Halman 1, Ham 3, Hamilton 18, Hamlin 4, Hammond 3, Hannah 4, Hand 1, Hanna 7, Hannan 4, Hannock 1, Hannum 3, Handsford 1, Hanson 1, Harbin 3, Hardabeck 1, Harden 3, Hardesty 13, Hardin 2, Hardlick 2, Hardy 1, Hargis 1, Harland 2, Harmon 1, Harp 2, Harper 8, Harrah 4, Harrell 2, Harring 1, Harris 18, Harrison 3, Harrold 1, Harstine 1, Hart 4, Harvey 3, Haseman 5, Hash 6, Hasket 1, Haskins 2, Hasler 7, Hastings 2, Hatcher 3, Hatfield 13, Hauser 1, Haussin 4, Hawkins 4, Hayden 3, Haydock 1, Hayes 8, Hayman 2, Haynes 2, Hays 17, Haywood 24, Headley 3, Hearse 1, Heath 4, Heaton 19, Hedden 1, Hedge 1, Hedges 2, Hedrick 4, Heenan 2, Hedar 1, Hein 2, Heitman 5, Helms 1, Helt 1, Hemry 1, Henderson 10, Hendricks 7, Hennen 1, Hennett 1, Henney 2, Henry 5, Henshaw 1, Hensley 8, Hepner 1, Herbert 2, Herndon 2, Herring 1, Herrol 1, Hert 3,Herzog 1, Heston 4, Heuson 1, Heynoo 1, Hickman 4, Hicks 7, Hidge/s 2, Higgins 1, Hikin 1, Hilbert 1, Hilburn 3, Hildebrand 1, Hilderick 1, Hill 6, Hilliar 3, Hindman 2, Hinds 2, Hinebrook 2, Himeman 6, Hinkle 2, Hinnan 1, Hinnenickhouse 1, Hinson 2, Hirth 2, Hitchcock 2, Hixon 6, Hlozanspy 1, Hobbs 1, Hochsteller 2, Hodge 1, Hodges 2, Hofoditz 1, Hoff 1, Hogland 1, Hoke 1, Holdeman 2, Holder 9, Holiday 1, Holland 5, Hollars 4, Holley 1, Hollifield 2, Hollingsworth 2, Hollowell 3, Holmes 2, Holson 1, Holt 2, Holtam 1, Holtsclaw 4, Holtz 1, Holtzclaw 2, Hoop 1, Hooper , Hoops 2, Hoover 1, Hopkins 2, Horn 8, Hornbeck 1, Hornbucker 1, Horton 1, Hosteller 3, Hostetler 3, Hostetter 7, Hoth 1, Houpt 2, Howard 7, Howell 7, Hubbard 4, Hubell 2, Hubble 1, Huddleston 1, Hudson 36, Huffman 11, Hughes 2, Humble 1, Hummel 1, Humphrey 1, Humphreys 9, Hunt 12, Hunter 22, Hurst 1, Hurzorg 1, Hushfuld 1, Hutchens 3, Hutchings 1, Hutchinson 2, Huton 1, and Hyslop 1,

 

Iles 1, Ingalis 1, Ingleman 1, Ingram 1, Inman 19, Irons 1, Isaacs 1, Isenhower 1, Isom 1, Israel 1, and Ivy.

 

Jack 1, Jackson 27, Jacobs 2, James 8, Jamison 4, Jarmin 1, Jarrell 4, Jarvins 1, Jarvis 4, Jay 1, Jean 6, Jeffers 8, Jenkins 2, Jenson 2, Jerone 1, Jessup 1, Jewell 6, Johnson 53, Johnston 1, Jolliff 3, Jones 7, Jordan 1, Jorman 1, Judge 1, Julian 2, Junkin 1, Justus 1,

 

Kaelin 1, Kaffinberger 1, Kaney 1, Kalo 1, Kaperak 1, Katoes 1, Kaufman 2, Kayser 1, Keed 1, Keene 1, Keggy 1, Keiser 1, Keler 1, Kellar 4, Keller 15, Kelley 3, Kelly 4, Kelsey 1, Kemp 2, Kendall 5, Kenney 1, Kent 5, Kerns 1, Kerr 1, Kerzan 1, Kessenger 1, Kessler 3, Keys 2, Kidd 6, Killinger 2, Killian 4, Killinger 6, Kilson 1, King 9, Kingery 1, Kinley 1, Kinnaman 4, Kierman 1, Kirby 4, Kirk 1, Kirkley 5, Kirkpatrick 1, Kirkwood 1, Kisola 1, Kiser 2, Kitchell 1, Kitson 1, Kline 1, Klinger 1, Klink 1, Knapp 2, Knight 2, Knoll 2, Knowles 2, Knox 3, Koban 1, Koester 2, Kramer 4, Kristley 1, Kunkler 2, Kunsman 2, Kuper 1, and Kutch 2.

 

Lace 3, Lacy 2, Lafever 1, Laffoon 2, Lamb 7, Lambert 3, Lamney 2, Lampard 1, Lancaster 1, Landers 1, Landis 8, Langer 1, Lankford 2, Larue 1, Lash 1, Laue 1, Laughlin 8, Lauson 2, Lawhorn 1, Lawler 1, Lawrence 2, Lawright 1, Lawson 6, Lay 1, Layman 1, Laymore 1, Leach 2, Levitt 1, Ledgerwood 1, Lee 8, Legrand 1, Lehman 9, Lenning 1, Leonard 2, Leslie 1, Lester 12, Letsinger 7, Levi 1, Levington 2, Lewis 16, Light 4, Lindley 3, Lindsey 5, Linthicum 2, Little 1, Littlejohn 2, Livermore 1, Livingston  7, Lochran 3, Locke 1, Loffland 2, Logston 1, Long 18, Loos 1, Loudermilk 2, Loughlin 1, Lois 1, Love 3, Loveall 3, Loveless 1, Low 1, Lowder 2, Lowe 1, Lowery 2, Loy 4, Loyd 2, Lucas 13, Lumpkin 2, Lund 3, Lundy 6, Lunsford 1, Luther 1, Lutton 1, Lutz 1, Luxton 2, Lynch 2, Lynn 9, and Lyons 2.  PRICE: $30.

 

Check all variants of spelling of your wsurnames.  Your ancestor might have known how to spell his ownname, but when he told the clerk what it was there is no guarantee the clerk spelled it correctly.  He only spelled what he heard.

 

One of my ancestors fell prey to the dreaded "TYPING ERROR.  She was a "WADE", but her will is indexed and filed on the following page under WASE.  Good thing I carefully check for common typing errors.   

 

We will talk about Marriage Records next time.

 

Thanks for reading our newsletters.  Helping Genealogists is what we do here, and it never hurts to review proper procedures to make sure we are not missing anything important.  Birth, Marriage and Death Certificates are an important part of everybody's life story.  The WPA records surely did simplify our search if we use their indexes to help us!  Pat from YOGS

 

 

Contact Information

Free telephone:1-800-419-0200 for orders.

Office telephone for questions, tracking numbers, availability of books not listed. 317-862-3330

***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***   ***

Thanks for taking the time to check out our crates.

We really appreciate those people who are willing to give our books a second chance to be helpful.  Who knows?  Maybe the one you have been looking for will be on this crate or the next crate.  Blend this research with your census and courthouse research and see how your family puzzle can grow to be more complete!

  Click here to Return to the Crazy Crates Main Page

 

Email Newsletter icon,
                  E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List
                  icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter

 YE OLDE GENEALOGIE SHOPPE
P.O.BOX 39128
INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46239


Order Catalog e-mail
 
Footer Copyright © 1999 - 2011 Ye Olde Genealogie Shoppe.